Men's Health

Pelvic Health Physiotherapists can offer treatment for the following conditions - Follow the links below to get more information and useful advice:

There are two main types of urinary incontinence:
 
  • Stress Incontinence – leakage of urine on exertion such as coughing, sneezing and during exercise
  • Urge Incontinence – leakage of urine occurring  when there is not enough time to reach the toilet
Urge incontinence is due to an overactive bladder:
 
Stress and urge incontinence can also occur together and this is known as mixed incontinence
 
If you are experiencing stress incontinence and/or urge incontinence, strengthening your pelvic floor muscles may help to resolve your symptoms
 
This animation shows the location of your pelvic floor muscles - Anatomy of the male pelvic floor
 
This video explains how to do pelvic floor muscle exercises (also known as Kegels) Male pelvic floor exercises
 
Pelvic floor exercises are also explained in these leaflets:
 
Using an app such as Squeezy for Men can help, as you can set reminders at times that suit your daily routine
 
Healthy bladder habits are important to help reduce urge incontinence:
 
Bladder training can often help to reduce urge incontinence. This is explained in this leaflet - Bladder Training
 
Here is an example of a bladder diary (as described in the leaflet) that you can complete - Bladder Diary
 
Healthy bowel habits are important as straining to empty your bowels can make urinary incontinence worse:
 
Useful Websites
 
Information Leaflets
 
  • Post Micturition Dribble
  • Promoting continence with Physiotherapy - This booklet is written by the POGP (Pelvic, Obstetric and Gynaecological Physiotherapy), a UK based Physiotherapy Professional Network affiliated to the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. It contains information about the physiotherapy advice and treatment available for anyone with bladder and bowel problems
You may have been referred for investigations by your Consultant or Continence Nurse Specialist. The links below provide information regarding two common bladder tests:
 
Ongoing Symptoms

If you have tried the exercises and advice but still feel you would like to see a Pelvic Health Physiotherapist regarding any ongoing bothersome symptoms you can request a referral from your:
  • Consultant
  • Urology Nurse Specialist
  • Bladder and Bowel Nurse Specialist
  • GP
Urinary incontinence is a common side effect following a prostatectomy (surgical removal of the prostate).
 
The following videos have been produced by the Urology Specialist Nurses and Pelvic Health Physiotherapists. They address common questions that men undergoing prostatectomy often ask about how to manage and reduce incontinence symptoms:
 
They can help to remind you of information given by the Nurse or Physiotherapist at your clinic appointment. 
 
Pelvic floor exercises are also explained in these leaflets:
 
Using an app such as Squeezy for Men can help, as you can set reminders at times that suit your daily routine
 
Healthy bladder habits are important to help reduce urge incontinence:
 
Bladder training can often help to reduce urge incontinence. This is explained in this leaflet - Bladder Training
 
Here is an example of a bladder diary (as described in the leaflet) that you can complete - Bladder Diary

Healthy bowel habits are important as straining to empty your bowels can make urinary incontinence worse:
 
Useful Websites
 
Information Leaflets
 
  • Post Micturition Dribble
  • Promoting continence with Physiotherapy - This booklet is written by the POGP (Pelvic, Obstetric and Gynaecological Physiotherapy), a UK based Physiotherapy Professional Network affiliated to the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. It contains information about the physiotherapy advice and treatment available for anyone with bladder and bowel problems
You may have been referred for investigations by your Consultant or Continence Nurse Specialist. The links below provide information regarding two common bladder tests:
 
Ongoing Symptoms

If you have tried the exercises and advice but still feel you would like to see a Pelvic Health Physiotherapist regarding any ongoing bothersome symptoms you can request a referral from your:
 
  • Consultant
  • Urology Nurse Specialist
  • Bladder and Bowel Nurse Specialist
  • GP
Chronic pelvic pain syndrome or CPPS is also known as chronic non-bacterial prostatitis.
 
The definition of CPPS is persistent or recurring symptoms of pain or discomfort in the perineum (the area between the anus and testicles), testicles and/or penis. It can sometimes also effect bladder, bowel and sexual function. The causes of CPPS are not completely understood. It is not thought to be caused by infection, but a number of other factors may be involved.
 
You may be referred to see a Pelvic Health Physiotherapist if your Consultant thinks that tension in your pelvic floor muscles may be contributing to your symptoms.
 
See below for some useful information that you may find helpful if you have tension in your pelvic floor muscles:
 
All exercises and stretches that you do should be completely comfortable, so stop if you experience any discomfort.
 
The information below may be helpful if you have a persistent pain condition: